Structured cablingWith copper structured cabling networks, it is important to specify the correct components which will handle the required application.

Both terms – class and category are both commonly used when referring to copper cabling networks, however they mean totally different things.

The class (or category link in American English) always applies to the installed link, the category as such applies only to one single component, e.g. the cable or the outlet;

The component for example a CAT6A jack is tested and verified by either the labs of the manufacturer or independent verification labs to confirm that the component meets the desired specification.

 Specific components are required in order to ensure that Class specifications are met in the installed link. For example, Class EA networks which support up to 500MHz, are generally made up of CAT6A components.

 

Cabling classes according to ISO/IEC

Class D: frequency range up to 100 MHz,

for data rates up to 1 Gbps

Class E: frequency range up to 250 MHz,

for data rates up to 1 GbpsCABLING

Class EA: frequency range up to 500 MHz,

for data rates up to 10 Gbps

Class F: frequency range up to 600 MHz,

for multi-media applications

Class FA: frequency range up to 1,000 MHz,

for multi-media applications

 

Component categories according to ISO/IEC

Category 5: frequency range up to 100 MHz,

for data rates up to 1 Gbps

Category 6: frequency range up to 250 MHz,

for data rates up to 1 Gbps

Category 6A: frequency range up to 500 MHz,

for data rates up to 10 Gbps

Category 7: frequency range up to 600 MHz,

for multi-media applications

Category 7A: frequency range up to 1,000 MHz,

for multi-media applications